Summer Reading List for accelerated readers

Anderson School Accelerated Readers

Summer Reading

I have added new books to the list (if you read from this list last summer!)

New books are bold

 Grades 2nd-4th –Choose and read 3 books from the list.  One book you will just read, don’t answer any questions.  For the other 2 books; answer all the Knowledge Questions and then choose at least 3 other questions to answer. You can only choose each Comprension-Analysis question once.   You must choose a different question for each book that you read this summer. 

 

3rd and 4th (next year)

The Lemonade War by Jacqueline Davies

The Birthday Ball by Lois Lowry

The Ballad of Knuckles McGraw by Lois Peterson

Triple Chocolate Brownie Genius by Deborah Sherman

Tales of a 4th Grade Nothing by Judy Blume

Riding the Flume by Patricia Curtis Pfitsch

The Great Brain by John Fitzgerald

The Canning Season by Polly Horvath

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilsn Rawls

Eragon by Christopher Paolini

2nd (next year)

Matilda by Roald Dahl

The Toothpaste Millionaire by Jean Merrill

The Borrowers by Mary Norton

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lundgren

How to eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell

Freckle Juice by Judy Blume

The Wheel on the School by Meindert DeJong

Stuart Little by EB White

Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary

The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner


KNOWLEDGE

  1. Write the names of the most important characters in the story.
  2. Identify the relationships of the characters in the story to one another.
  3. When and where does the story seem to take place? What clues in the story did you use to determine the place (setting) and the time the story took place?
  4. Where does most of the action take place? Tell or write something that happened in each of the places you mention.
  5. What was the climax (high point) of the story?

COMPREHENSION

  1. If there is a picture in the book, tell or write what happened BEFORE the picture

and then what happened AFTER the picture. Be brief!

  1. Find a sentence in the story that has some words in it that you do not understand. Explain that sentence in your own words. Remember, context of a sentence is important.
  2. What did the author want you to think about the main character? What things in the story made you think this is what the author wanted you to think? In other words, can you prove why you think as you do about the main character?
  3. What was the cause of any one of the happenings in the story? In other words, what made something happen? Was it something someone did, or said, or something that just happened?
  4. Write a summary of the story.
  5. Illustrate funny, sad, exciting, etc. parts of the book. Use an art medium that is appropriate to the story.

APPLICATION

  1. Think of one way that a person in the story solved a problem. When you have

decided on the person (or animal, or . . .), tell or write what you learned about solving the problem that you could use sometime in solving a problem of your own. What kind of trouble was he/she in? What was the problem to be solved? Do you have any of the same problems?

  1. Think of a situation that happened to a person in the story and decide whether you would have done the same thing he/she did or something different. Tell or write what you might have done in the same situation.
  2. Make a colorful illustration of an exciting scene in the book. Glue your picture to a piece of cardboard, laminate it and then cut it into puzzle parts. Be sure to put the title of the book and the author on your puzzle. Put your puzzle in the class reading center for others to enjoy.
  3. Select any one of the characters in the story and think of some things each would do if he/she came to your class during reading. Try one character first, then another, and see if you can decide how they would act in P.E., science, etc.
  4. Create a diorama from a scene in the book.
  5. Make an illustrated dictionary for the NEW words you found in the book as you read it.
  6. Write a letter to a friend telling about the book. Be sure to include what or who the book is about, something about the author, the high point in the book, and the ending.
  7. Make a map showing the setting of the book.

SYNTHESIS

  1. What if you were involved in an exciting part of the story. How would you feel?
  2. Write another ending to the story that is different from the one the author wrote. Write a least one paragraph.
  3. Write a poem about the story or one of the characters or events.
  4. Think back in the story and try rewriting an incident from it. Substitute setting, a secondary character, or add on to the incident. For example, substitute a dog for a wolf in the THREE LITTLE PIGS.
  5. Create a game for others to play that will check to see if they really read the book.
  6. Design a mobile, poster or bulletin board to promote the book.
  7. Have a “Man in the Street” interview with one of the characters in the book.
  8. Make some illustrations for the ELMO projector and use these in the a storytelling situation.
  9. Rewrite as necessary to make the book into a play and then present your play to the class.
  10. After reading only half of the book, can you PREDICT what will happen in the rest of the book to the person or animal, to the family? Or what will happen next? Give reasons for you predictions.

EVALUATION

  1. Was the main character in the book good or bad? Defend your decision with

examples from the book.

  1. Choose two persons in the story and decide which character is the better of the two and why you think so.
  2. Think about two books you have read and tell which one you would recommend to a friend and why.
  3. Judge the main character’s actions in the story and describe how you might have acted differently. Think carefully about your decisions and justify your answer.
  4. Write a presentation to the school librarian recommending your book for inclusion in the school library. Defend you recommendation appropriately.
  5. Choose a character from the book and tell what you think about that person. Do you like him/her? Why or why not? Would you like to have that person as a friend? Why or why not? Be specific and use examples to defend your decision.

ANALYSIS

  1. What part of the story was the funniest? Most exciting? Saddest?
  2. Put key events in the story on a sequence chart to use in a “Book Talk” to encourage others to read that book.
  3. Think about the story. Write new titles for the story that would give others a good idea about the story.
  4. Summarize the story or book including the most important, or key, idea. These ideas influence the outcome of the story. (You may want to brainstorm ideas with others who have read the story.) How did these ideas affect the outcome of the story?
  5. Some things in a story are true (facts) and others are someone’s opinion. Think about what was the fact and what was opinion in the story and write a comparative listing of your findings.
  6. What was the author’s purpose in writing the book? What idea, feeling, etc. did he want to give you about the theme?
  7. Compare the book to a TV program or movie that is similar.
  8. Make a timeline of events in the book.
  9. Compare and contrast this book’s main character with a real person you know or with similar character in another book.

 

 

Adapted from North Topsail Elementary School, Hampstead, N.C.

Grades 5th-8th –Choose and read 3 books from the list.  One book you will just read, don’t answer any questions.  For the other 2 books; answer all the Knowledge Questions and then choose one question from each of the other sections.  You can only choose each Comprension-Analysis question once.   You must choose a different question for each book that you read this summer.

 

7th and 8th (next year)

Rocket Boys by Homar Hickam

My Thirteenth Winter by Samantha Abeel

Deliver Us from Normal by Kate Klise

The Pearl by John Steinbeck

Little Lord Fontleray by Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis

The Bomb by Theodore Taylor

The Wednesday War by Gary D. Schmidt

A Solitary Blue by Cynthia Voight

The Upstairs Room by Johanna Reiss

Children of the River by Linda Crew

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

5th and 6th (next year)

The View from Saturday by E.L Konisburg

Surviving the Applewhites by Stephanie Tolan

Ida B and her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster and (Possibly) Save the     World By Katherine Hannigan

Shadow of a Bull by Maia Wojciechowska

The Neverending Story by Michael Ende

Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

After the Last Dog Died by Carmen Bredeson

Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank Gilbreth

Crash by Jerry Spinelli

The Keeper by Mal Peet

The True Confession of Charlotte Doyle by Avi

 KNOWLEDGE

  1. Write the names of the most important characters in the story.
  2. Identify the relationships of the characters in the story to one another.
  3. When and where does the story seem to take place? What clues in the story did you use to determine the place (setting) and the time the story took place?
  4. Where does most of the action take place? Tell or write something that happened in each of the places you mention.
  5. What was the climax (high point) of the story?

 

COMPREHENSION

  1. If there is a picture in the book, tell or write what happened BEFORE the picture

and then what happened AFTER the picture. Be brief!

  1. Find a sentence in the story that has some words in it that you do not understand. Explain that sentence in your own words. Remember, context of a sentence is important.
  2. What did the author want you to think about the main character? What things in the story made you think this is what the author wanted you to think? In other words, can you prove why you think as you do about the main character?
  3. What was the cause of any one of the happenings in the story? In other words, what made something happen? Was it something someone did, or said, or something that just happened?
  4. Write a summary of the story.
  5. Illustrate funny, sad, exciting, etc. parts of the book. Use an art medium that is appropriate to the story.

 APPLICATION

  1. Think of one way that a person in the story solved a problem. When you have

decided on the person (or animal, or . . .), tell or write what you learned about solving the problem that you could use sometime in solving a problem of your own. What kind of trouble was he/she in? What was the problem to be solved? Do you have any of the same problems?

  1. Think of a situation that happened to a person in the story and decide whether you would have done the same thing he/she did or something different. Tell or write what you might have done in the same situation.
  2. Make a colorful illustration of an exciting scene in the book. Glue your picture to a piece of cardboard, laminate it and then cut it into puzzle parts. Be sure to put the title of the book and the author on your puzzle. Put your puzzle in the class reading center for others to enjoy.
  3. Select any one of the characters in the story and think of some things each would do if he/she came to your class during reading. Try one character first, then another, and see if you can decide how they would act in P.E., science, etc.
  4. Create a diorama from a scene in the book.
  5. Make an illustrated dictionary for the NEW words you found in the book as you read it.
  6. Write a letter to a friend telling about the book. Be sure to include what or who the book is about, something about the author, the high point in the book, and the ending.
  7. Make a map showing the setting of the book.

 SYNTHESIS

  1. What if you were involved in an exciting part of the story. How would you feel?
  2. Write another ending to the story that is different from the one the author wrote. Write a least one paragraph.
  3. Write a poem about the story or one of the characters or events.
  4. Think back in the story and try rewriting an incident from it. Substitute setting, a secondary character, or add on to the incident. For example, substitute a dog for a wolf in the THREE LITTLE PIGS.
  5. Create a game for others to play that will check to see if they really read the book.
  6. Design a mobile, poster or bulletin board to promote the book.
  7. Have a “Man in the Street” interview with one of the characters in the book.
  8. Make some illustrations for the ELMO projector and use these in the a storytelling situation.
  9. Rewrite as necessary to make the book into a play and then present your play to the class.
  10. After reading only half of the book, can you PREDICT what will happen in the rest of the book to the person or animal, to the family? Or what will happen next? Give reasons for you predictions.

 EVALUATION

  1. Was the main character in the book good or bad? Defend your decision with

examples from the book.

  1. Choose two persons in the story and decide which character is the better of the two and why you think so.
  2. Think about two books you have read and tell which one you would recommend to a friend and why.
  3. Judge the main character’s actions in the story and describe how you might have acted differently. Think carefully about your decisions and justify your answer.
  4. Write a presentation to the school librarian recommending your book for inclusion in the school library. Defend you recommendation appropriately.
  5. Choose a character from the book and tell what you think about that person. Do you like him/her? Why or why not? Would you like to have that person as a friend? Why or why not? Be specific and use examples to defend your decision.

 ANALYSIS

  1. What part of the story was the funniest? Most exciting? Saddest?
  2. Put key events in the story on a sequence chart to use in a “Book Talk” to encourage others to read that book.
  3. Think about the story. Write new titles for the story that would give others a good idea about the story.
  4. Summarize the story or book including the most important, or key, idea. These ideas influence the outcome of the story. (You may want to brainstorm ideas with others who have read the story.) How did these ideas affect the outcome of the story?
  5. Some things in a story are true (facts) and others are someone’s opinion. Think about what was the fact and what was opinion in the story and write a comparative listing of your findings.
  6. What was the author’s purpose in writing the book? What idea, feeling, etc. did he want to give you about the theme?
  7. Compare the book to a TV program or movie that is similar.
  8. Make a timeline of events in the book.
  9. Compare and contrast this book’s main character with a real person you know or with similar character in another book.

 

 

Adapted from North Topsail Elementary School, Hampstead, N.C.